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Seizure Awareness

Pricilla Perez and Zoe Shepard

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When someone experiences a seizure it can be unnoticeable or disabling. Seizures are often unknown to students and teachers who don’t have them. As a witness to seizures, they can be frightening for both the individual having the seizure and those helping. A seizure itself isn’t a disorder, but more like a change. Heritage has had few students that have experienced seizures, and as our school nurse, Ms. Burks, says it is important that you “time when a seizure starts and finishes, clear everything in the way to protect the students head, use a backpack or a sweatshirt under their head.” Coach Allen, who is a paramedic, stresses that you do not hold onto the person having a seizure. “A lot of people try to spot the person having a seizure, and hold them down but that can actually tear ligaments or muscles.” He also adds that you should “refrain from moving the person unless they are vomiting.”

There are different types of seizures “petit mal, grand mal, and absent seizures. Signs before someone experiences a seizure vary from seeing blurry lights, feeling sick, being nauseous, but some students may not even have warning signs,” Ms. Burks explains. Petit mal seizures are described by the epilepsy foundation as  “beginning and ending abruptly and without warning. It consists of a period of unconsciousness with a blank stare. It may look like the person is daydreaming. The person may lose muscle control and make repetitive movements such as: chewing movements, rapid breathing, rhythmic blinking, slight movements or tugging at clothing.” A grand mal is a seizure that can cause convulsing, muscle contractions and a loss of unconsciousness.  A grand mal seizure is most likely the most frightening seizure because of the convulsing.

After someone experiences a seizure make sure to check them for any injuries, don’t give the person anything to eat or drink until they are absolutely, fully, aware of their surroundings; most people will be confused and sleepy after experiencing a seizure. A well-known biology teacher at Heritage, Mrs. Hutcheson, suggests that “researchers have found that 40% of suto seizures are caused by a cardiac/organic reason. ”

Whether you have seizures or have witnessed someone having a seizure, be sure to provide the best and utmost care they can receive. They will be just as frightened as you will be.

 

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The student news site of Rogers Heritage High School
Seizure Awareness